"Life is too short to make bad art."

Friday, November 4, 2011

Cracking up

Here's a quick post on how to create the crack in the office window tutorial. It's basically a quick use of the straight line and bezier curve tool and some moving around of nodes. 



Note:
Combining the spiky shapes (Path/ Union) cleans it up a little bit more - as you won't see the overlaps. Keep in mind to combine two objects at a time in inkscape.  

I hope this quick tutorial explains the creation of the crack well enough.




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7 comments:

  1. Amazing!!
    thanks for all tuts, the best inkscape site!

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  2. I dont understand why you would have the lighter group below the darker group?

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  3. @Cooper - It just depends on the effect you want to achieve and the colours of the background you place the cracks on... Sometimes it looks better to keep the light on top - it creates more depth in the 'cut line'... The crack in the window had no 'surface' below the black cut... I hope this makes sense...

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  4. I'm a little unclear how you did the grunge effect (first mentioned in the Office windows tutorial). Is that one of the filters options in Inkscape?

    Thanks!

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  5. @Jellinger - no... it's not a filter option it's a set of vector shapes I keep handy to 'grunge up' some vector art right in inkscape rather than in gimp.
    I googled grunge vectors and found this one...
    http://www.bittbox.com/freebies/50-free-vector-grunge-corners
    [which is close to what I am using]

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  6. I can't really get how you are drawing a spiky ended shape, with berzier curve tool. Inkscape has triangle in/out but only for a line and I even can't find out how to manipulate the lines' width :( (yeah, I'm a programmer :P )

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  7. Kon_nos - no problem... It's not a line with a width... The example crack [image 1] is a 10 node shape I handdrew with the line tool. You draw on line that has the shape intended and then track back with a small spacing to the beginning node.

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